With the pet industry making billions of dollars each year, the lengths that people will go to pamper their pets is astounding. This outpouring of love and money doesn’t stop when a pet dies, and Furever looks at the various ways in which people grieve their furry family members. From simple items like headstones or memorials, all the way to taxidermy and cloning, some people may spend more money on their deceased pets than their deceased relatives.

Despite the rather strange premise for this film, there’s a great deal of respect shown for each individual interviewed. The best way to sum things up comes at the end of the film when taxidermist Mac, who performs freeze drying for deceased pets, states that he hopes people understand the reasons why someone might do these things, even if they themselves wouldn’t.

Animal lovers, or pet parents as they’re called in the documentary, probably aren’t going to think anything is odd about the ways people preserve their pets forever. With DNA diamonds, statues, hair clippings, freeze drying, and even mummification, every avenue is available for grieving pet owners. The film also looks at some of the science behind the love people feel for pets, as it stirs the same chemical cocktail that having a child does. Furever does what a good documentary should, showing viewers a world they may know nothing about.

Is Furever Essential Hot Docs Viewing?

Yes, but just because this is one of those ‘you have to see it, to believe it’ films. Furever may not be exposing a worldwide problem, or tackling social issues that we must deal with, but it’s extremely entertaining. Whether you connect with the people in the film, or just think everything is a bit odd, it’s going to be hard to pass this one up.

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