This bold and diverse selection of Canadian shorts includes work by established artists like Shane Belcourt, Lisa Jackson, Michelle Latimer, Danis Goulet, Marie Clements and others, alongside relative newcomers like Elisa Moar, who made her first experimental film, Tides, in 2012. Terril Calder, the animator behind Michelle Latimer’s Genie nominated Choke, is back with her third directorial effort. Real Junior Leblanc (a poet and artist who has produced three award winning shorts since 2010), Thirza Cuthand (a Cree filmmaker who has made many shorts dealing with issues of sexuality, family and queer identity), painter, filmmaker and playwright and Alejandro Valbuena (whose short Burnt won Best Experimental Film at imagineNATIVE 2010) round out the group of diverse and multi-talented Canadians represented in the programme.

Michelle Latimer’s I Can’t Remember is a haunting, black and white exploration of memory and past, and a pretty great music video for Jayli Wolf’s song by the same name. The dreamy quality of Wolf’s voice is perfectly matched with the etherial, misty, sparkly images Latimer layers on the screen. In Eliza Moar’s Micta, a visually ecstatic collage of light and colour perfectly illustrates a quote from Saint-Exupéry’s The Little Prince – “and since it is beautiful, it is truly useful. Marie Clements’ film, Pilgrims (which also played at TIFF this year) is a disturbing and at times darkly funny tale of a man who gets way more than he bargained for in his quest to experience authentic “native culture”.

Is The Power Within: Canadian Shorts Program Essential ImagineNATIVE Viewing?

Definitely! The diversity of voices – from all parts of the country – represented here will give newbies a great primer on Aboriginal filmmaking in Canada. And if you’re already an imagineNATIVE convert, then get out there and show some Canadian pride!

The Power Within: Canadian Shorts Program screening times

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The Power Within: Canadian Shorts Program gallery

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