Toronto After Dark 2013 Review: The Battery

Adam Cronheim and Jeremy Gardner in The Battery

Ben and Mickey are two former baseball players who find themselves thrown together at the onslaught of the zombie apocalypse. They have endured being trapped in a house for months, witnessed their loved ones being turned, and aided each other in the struggle to stay alive. Now they only have each other as they move around through New England, trying to keep ahead of the zombies, searching for a purpose to keep going, and figuring out how to put up with each other.

If you consider that this film was made on a budget of $6000, it is an indie masterpiece, however it should be noted that The Battery is a tale of reluctant friendship and not a zombie movie by its classical definition. It contrasts two very different young men who are thrown together by extreme circumstances, and even then they hardly want to be around each other. Yet there is a genuine bond between Ben and Mickey that only comes out in moments of desperation and in the face of death. It’s a poignant character study that audiences will either find a refreshing change from your typical gore fest, or deadly boring.

There’s no denying this is a slow moving film, and that includes the zombies. It’s a wonder they were even able to wipe out mankind in the first place, which calls the entire premise of the movie into question. If you can look past that, it’s still going to be an hour into the movie before anything happens that will remotely make you jump. Can you handle the wait?

Is The Battery essential Toronto After Dark Viewing?

Overall, no, not if you’re here to be scared and grossed out. Though some might consider it an indie gem and innovative for its methods of storytelling, The Battery won’t satisfy those out for a night of wild, gruesome cinema.

The Battery screening times

More about The Battery

The Battery trailer

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Ada Wong is a writer, traveler, jewelry-maker, tea connoisseur, and lost shoe photographer from Toronto who’s endlessly opinionated about everything — especially film. She would like Evan Rachel Wood to portray her in a partially-fictionalized bio pic, and for Woody Allen to write and direct it. Ada once made front page news with her favourite director Quentin Tarantino, her only regret is that it wasn’t for more scandalous reasons.

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