European Union 2013 Review: Love.net

Everything can be found on the internet, and that includes all forms of love and sexual offerings. Love.net gives us a glimpse through a handful of computers (and residents) of Sophia, Bulgaria. Mila discovers her husband has been meeting other women on a dating site; jailbait Devora lies about her age and garners many online admirers with her sexy, sophisticated selfies ; John and Joana connect from across the continent over a search for a 70’s music video; and skeptic reporter Toni stumbles upon love in the midst of his (literally) hands-on research.

There seems to be an increasing number of films about online dating, virtual love, and other technological connections, but Love.net stands out for its lack of pretense. Filmmaker Ilian Djevelekov asked for submissions from Bulgaria’s largest dating site and developed his ensemble film from the stories he received. The result is warm, thoughtful and appealing, Love.net is entertaining without being pretentious or glorifying.

Lilia Maraviglia is terrific as the lonely Mila Bogateva, who garners her husband’s love online but paradoxically removes him further from her in their frigid marriage. Their unusual tale is complex but plausible, the audience feels every moment of her anguish. Djevelekov makes a wise choice utilizing Mila and Andrey ‘s story as the central plot, subsequently weaving in several subplots, which provide great comedic counterpoint. The story of 14 year old Devora masquerading as an 18 year is also a stark reminder to monitor our children in this technologically advanced age. Love.net may take place halfway around the world, but hits close to home.

Is Love.net essential European Union Film Festival viewing?

Yes, the topics and themes of Love.net effortlessly transcend any language barriers. More importantly it’s entertaining and will appeal to a wide audience. Not to be missed.

Love.net screening time

More About Love.net

Love.net trailer

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Ada Wong is a writer, traveler, jewelry-maker, tea connoisseur, and lost shoe photographer from Toronto who’s endlessly opinionated about everything — especially film. She would like Evan Rachel Wood to portray her in a partially-fictionalized bio pic, and for Woody Allen to write and direct it. Ada once made front page news with her favourite director Quentin Tarantino, her only regret is that it wasn’t for more scandalous reasons.

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