Screening as part of Short Cuts Canada Programme 3, The Weatherman and the Shadowboxer blends live action and digital animation to tell the story of two brothers whose lives have taken very different directions, even though they share the same troubled past. Toronto Film Scene got to speak with director Randall Okita about his film, and what he hopes he’ll find at TIFF 2014.

Describe your film in 10 words or less.

A hybrid movie about memories and identity.

What inspired you to make this film?

My family.

What was the best thing about production? Most frustrating?

The best thing about production is the people, the most frustrating is that it ends.

What’s the one thing you want people to know about your film?

I made it for them.

Your film is screening as part of TIFF — what are you most excited about seeing or doing at this year’s festival?

I can’t wait to watch that film that changes my brain in ways that I couldn’t have expected.

Last year, your short Portrait as a Random Act of Violence screened at TIFF, and it was dialogue free. With this latest short, you still create a beautiful visual image, but there’s also dialogue through a narrator. Do you find it easier to tell your story through words, or through visuals?

I find it equally impossible on both fronts! But I’m working on it.

The Weatherman and the Shadowboxer screens as part of Short Cuts Canada Programme 3 at TIFF 2014. Check their website for more information.