For 30 years, Delroy has gone from his home in Jamaica to a tobacco field in Ontario as a migrant worker. He has to leave his family behind for 6 months at a time, which is difficult enough, but Delroy is also suffering with cancer, something he continues to maintain will be fine when it becomes obvious that it won’t.

The short film Babe, I Hate to Go is an interesting look at the way in which we deal with illness, as well as the lengths some have to go to provide for their family. While a similar film would show the ups and downs of Delroy coping with his cancer, here we see Delroy just isn’t that type of person. Whether he’s in denial or is trying to maintain a brave face for his family, we may never be quite sure, but it’s a unique look at the way one person faces a deadly disease.

Every moment of the short is heartbreaking. We watch as Delroy says goodbye to his family, brushes off questions from his mother about the rather large tumour on his chest, and prepares himself for what may be the final time away from his family. As we reach the end, we never find out what will happen to Delroy in the future, but a moment of song between Delroy and another worker perhaps shows that Delroy will finally come to an acceptance of his inoperable cancer.

Is Babe, I Hate to Go essential festival viewing?

A very moving and unique look at one man with the world upon his shoulders, and the strength to carry it all.

Babe, I Hate to Go screening times

Babe, I Hate to Go Trailer

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