Issue: May 2012 - Short Films

The comedy of Cosmopolis: an interview with David Cronenberg and Robert Pattinson

When a director is as prolific as David Cronenberg, it is not uncommon to end up interviewing them more than once in the same year for different projects. I had spoken with Cronenberg earlier this year when  Dangerous Method  had its Canadian release and with this week’s release of Cosmopolis , I found myself face to face with the icon for the second time in six months. Somehow I had completely forgotten that the man is way more amusing than I would ever expect him to be. “I used a little Apple program called iDirector,” Cronenberg announces of his...

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Nobody’s Goon: an interview with Marc-Andre Grondin

Before Québécois actor, Marc-André Grondin started work on the Canadian hockey comedy, Goon , he was not what you would call a great skater. “I skated like shit,” is how he actually put it to me when we met recently at the Drake Hotel in Toronto. This meant Grondin would have to train to convincingly play Xavier Laflamme, a major league hockey player burnout, who has been demoted to the minor league, which he can still barely keep up with. “The players today are machines. They start at 12 in the gym. There are like five guys in all...

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Freaky all-nighters, free flicks and Fassbender: what to watch at this year’s CFC Worldwide Short Film Festival

Toronto is certainly not hurting for film festivals designed to keep local cinephiles busy pouring over programme guides, queuing for tickets or spending long afternoons in darkened theatres. In fact, we have so many that for a hard core festival-goer one can very easily blend into the next. That’s why it’s always such a treat when June rolls around and the CFC Worldwide Short Film Festival (WSFF) returns once more to remind us all that films don’t necessarily need to be feature-length to pack a punch and that there’s definitely some merit to that old adage “short and sweet.”...

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5 Questions: Angie Driscoll, Interim Artistic Director, CFC Worldwide Short Film Festival

Angie Driscoll grew up loving Canadian film, “When I was little I’d stay up late watching Cinema Canada on the CBC.” And it’s a good thing too, because it’s that love for our often underappreciated indigenous cinema that lead to her becoming a cheerleader for cinematic products that might be considered “underdogs” by both audiences and those in the film industry. Nowhere is that truth more evident than in the world of short film. “I want to make people understand that shorts are not just a stepping stone to making a feature film, but that they feature a range...

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Getting Familiar: an interview with Zach Green of Fatal Pictures

On March 2, 2012, the incredible short film, Familiar , had its world premiere right here in Toronto. There couldn’t be a better place for Fatal Pictures to unleash their latest film, since the production company is based in the city. Co-founded by Richard Powell and Zach Green in 2007, the company has built a small but strong string of short films. I had an opportunity to speak with producer Zach Green about Fatal Pictures’ latest short Familiar , as well as the future of the company. “I went to film school here in Toronto for Post Production (Editing)....

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When nightmares become reality: talking The Captured Bird with Jovanka Vuckovic and Jason Lapeyre

The highly anticipated short film debut by former Rue Morgue editor-in-chief Jovanka Vuckovic , The Captured Bird , now has a home for its premiere at the Worldwide Short Film Festival as well as a spot at Cannes Film Festival as part of the Short Film Corner. Bolstering an incredible roster of genre talent, The Captured Bird is executive produced by monster aficionado Guillermo Del Toro ( Pacific Rim , Hellboy , Pan’s Labyrinth ), produced by Jason Lapeyre ( I Declare War — winner at this year’s ActionFest for Best Screenplay and Best Picture), editor Douglas Buck (...

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Read This: Into the Past: the Cinema of Guy Maddin

In 2003, I brought my sister and father to see Guy Maddin’s The Saddest Music in the World with me. Halfway through the film, the two of them leaned over to whisper in my ear that they were going to leave, and that they’d meet me after the movie was over. As we discussed their opinions over a drink afterward, they informed me that they were confused by both the film’s look and intentions. This is the conundrum that is Guy Maddin: he is inarguably among the strangest of contemporary filmmakers, and yet his work draws upon (even recycles)...

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